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Legal Alert Stamp Duties Law & Enforcement
 
In this Issue:
1. Legal Alert for August, 2009 – Stamp Duties Law & Enforcement in Nigeria.
2. Subscribe & Unsubscribe to Legal Alerts.
3. Disclaimer Notice.
Legal Alert for August, 2009 – Stamp Duties Law & Enforcement in Nigeria
The recent economic down-turn and governments' need to expand their revenue base brought about the resuscitation of the legal requirement that all written instruments in Nigeria, of a contractual nature, must be stamped. This development has led to some disquiet in the business community where many practitioners are curious to know the legal basis for this "new tax" requirement.
Stamp duties payment is one of the oldest imposed tax. It is true that stamp duties is the least recognised and enforced of all the taxes and duties in Nigeria. However, in modern times, the legal requirement that all written documents must be stamped obviously affects everyone's day-to-day business life.
Stamp duties payment matters are governed by the Stamp Duties Act, cap 411, Laws of the Federation of Nigeria, 1990. This legal alert gives you a synopsis of what the Stamp Duties Act regulates.
Stamp Duties Act
Stamp duties, unlike other forms of taxes or duties, are taxes on written documents as opposed to taxes directly imposed on individuals or their transactions.
The care for and the management of stamp duties in Nigeria is imposed on the Commissioner for Stamp Duties. The Federal Government of Nigeria is the only competent authority allowed to impose, charge and collect stamp duties on written instruments between one incorporated company and another incorporated company or individual. The converse is the case that State Governments impose, charge and collect stamp duties on written instruments that are executed between individuals only.
Unlike other taxes, the decision not to stamp a written document does not attract a criminal penalty as it only bars such a written document from being admitted in evidence in a civil judicial proceeding. Thus, until a written document is stamped at the Stamp Duties office by the payment of the applicable stamp duties on the document, such a document will remain inadmissible. See Section 22 (4) of the Stamp Duties Act.
Generally, stamp duties is charged at the rate of 75k on every N50 of the consideration of a conveyance. For other kinds of written documents, various rates of charge are imposed as stamp duties.
In the term of implementation, a written document is stamped by the affixing of adhesive stamps on it or the affixing of what is known as a die to the material or written instrument.
Every written instrument which is required to be stamped with an adhesive stamp must be stamped on or before its execution. In practice however, a grace period of forty days from when the written instrument is executed is allowed before a penalty accrues on the document for late presentation for stamping.
Any person presenting a written document for stamping after the date of its first execution must pay a penalty which includes (i) the unpaid stamp duty; (ii) a penalty of N20 or such sum as is charged by the stamp duty office; (iii) interest on such duty at the rate of ten per cent (10%) per annum from the day when the instrument was first executed up to the time when the unpaid duty is paid.
Conclusion
Barring any special reason, it is always recommended that sensitive business documents should be stamped before or immediately they are executed. There are stamp duties offices all over the federation of Nigeria who are always willing to provide applicants with information and assessment of what it will costs them to stamp their documents. This is a preferred option to none stamping of your written documents.
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DISCLAIMER NOTICE. This Legal Alert is a free educational material, for your general information and enlightenment purposes ONLY. This Alert, by itself, does not create a Client/Attorney relationship between yourself and our Law Firm.
Recipients are therefore advised to seek professional legal counselling to their specific situations when they do arise. Questions, comments, criticisms, suggestions, new ideas, contributions, etc are always welcomed with many thanks.
This Legal Alert is protected by Intellectual Property Law and Regulations. It may however be shared with other parties provided that our Authorship is always acknowledged and this Disclaimer Notice is attached.
Legal Alert Dormant Companies – Legal & Tax Implications
 
In this Issue:
1. Legal Alert for July, 2009 – Dormant Companies in Nigeria – Legal & Tax Implications.
2. Subscribe & Unsubscribe to Legal Alerts.
3. Disclaimer Notice.
Legal Alert for July 2009 – Dormant Companies in Nigeria – Legal & Tax Implications
There is no statutory description, in Nigeria, of what a dormant company is, or what a dormant company means. In practice however, a dormant company is one that is not carrying on business or trading, for whatever reason. In jurisdictions where legislative provision is made for regulating dormant companies, a dormant company is described as one that has not had any significant accounting transaction during the relevant financial year.
Shareholders of dormant companies in Nigeria have over the years being under the impression that there were no statutory reporting and compliance requirements for them under Nigerian Law. Efforts by the Corporate Affairs Commission ("CAC") to de-list some dormant companies in Nigeria have also not served as a deterrent for these companies to meet the minimum regulatory requirements.
This Alert reviews the minimum legal and tax compliance requirements for all incorporated companies in Nigeria, whether they are dormant or active.
Legal Compliance Requirements
All incorporated companies in Nigeria are regulated by the provisions of the Companies and Allied Matters Act, 1990 ("CAMA"). It is a mandatory provision of CAMA that every company in Nigeria must hold its first Annual General Meeting ("AGM") within eighteen months of its incorporation. Subsequent AGMs must be held at least once in a year by shareholders of each and every company in Nigeria.
The failure to hold any of these statutory shareholders meetings renders the incorporated company and every officer of it liable, on conviction, to a fine of N50 (Fifty Naira) for every day for which the offence continues unabated. In some instances, the failure to hold an AGM and file the appropriate Annual Returns ("AR") could be a ground for winding up a company. See Sections 211, 212 and 408 of CAMA.
A key item for consideration at every shareholders meeting is the review and approval of the audited accounts of the company. Once the audited accounts of a company are approved by its shareholders, the annual returns for the company with the accompanying audited accounts must be filed at the CAC within 42 days after the date of the holding of the AGM. The annual returns of every Nigerian incorporated company must disclose the situation of the register of the members/shareholders of the company with the list of its debenture holders, the particulars of the current directors, shareholders and secretary of the company, it's authorised issued and paid up capital, turnover and debts, etc.
Tax Compliance Requirements
Every company that is incorporated/registered in Nigeria is required to file a tax return, preferably a self-assessment tax return, at least once in a year. Accompanying the tax return must be the audited accounts of the company or a statement of its affairs indicating that it has not been engaged in material financial activity. A one percent bonus is usually credited to companies that file their tax returns and pay their taxes within the statutorily stipulated period.
A minimum tax is payable where a company declares that it has not made any profit in the relevant tax year. The minimum tax provision is however not applicable if at least 25% of the equity holding of the company is held by a foreign investor or the company is engaged in agricultural business or it is within the first four (4) years of its carrying on its business.
The penalty for late filing or non-filing of a tax return is N25,000 for the first month in which the failure occurred, and N5,000 for each subsequent month in which the failure continues. Where the offence of late filing or non-filing is established to have been committed with the knowledge or consent or connivance of a director or manager or secretary of the company, such a company official shall be liable on conviction to a fine of N10,000 or to imprisonment for a term of two years or to both the fine and the term of imprisonment. See Section 41 of the Companies Income Tax Act ("CITA").
Conclusion
Legal and tax commentators have criticised the lack of adequate regulation of dormant companies in Nigeria. In addition to their existence being a loss of revenue to the government, it is argued that they deprive other entrepreneurs the opportunity to utilise the business names of such dormant companies particularly where the shareholders of the dormant company have abandoned any intention of continuing to carry on business under such a name in the future.
The minimum legal and tax requirements for all corporations in Nigeria, whether dormant or not, are higher when compared to jurisdiction like the United Kingdom where the reporting requirements for a dormant company are enumerated in the UK Companies Act, and are minimal. Present attempts to amend the provisions of CAMA will do well to recognise the short-term benefits on the one hand or disadvantages on the other that a dormant company may have to the Nigerian economy, and regulate its practice accordingly.
Until CAMA and CITA legislations are amended, dormant companies in Nigerian will be advised to comply with the existing statutory requirements.
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This Alert and others produced by us are provided without any charge to you. You can always subscribe to it, on behalf of other interested persons from whom you have their permission, by sending to us a one line e-mail with the words "Subscribe – Legal Alerts" followed by the desired email address.
You are equally permitted to terminate your subscription by sending to us a one line email with the words "Unsubscribe - Legal Alerts" and your electronic address would be removed from our list. In the future, you can return to our mailing list by visiting our web site www.oseroghoassociates.com to subscribe for the Legal Alerts.
DISCLAIMER NOTICE. This Legal Alert is a free educational material, for your general information and enlightenment purposes ONLY. This Alert, by itself, does not create a Client/Attorney relationship between yourself and our Law Firm.
Recipients are therefore advised to seek professional legal counselling to their specific situations when they do arise. Questions, comments, criticisms, suggestions, new ideas, contributions, etc are always welcomed with many thanks.
This Legal Alert is protected by Intellectual Property Law and Regulations. It may however be shared with other parties provided that our Authorship is always acknowledged and this Disclaimer Notice is attached.
Legal Alert Land Ownership & Land Certificates in Nigeria Probative Value
 
In this Issue:
1. Legal News – Lagos State Consumption Tax Law
2. Legal Alert for June, 2009 – The probative value of land certificates to land ownership in Nigeria.
3. Subscribe & Unsubscribe to Legal Alerts.
4. Disclaimer Notice.
Legal News: Lagos State Consumption Tax Law
The Lagos State Government has signed into Law a Consumption Tax Law on goods and services consumed in Hotels, Restaurants and Event Centres. A flat 5% tax will now be charged at all such venues to the exclusion of the already existing VAT tax.
Legal Alert for June 2009 – Land Ownership & Land Certificates in Nigeria – Probative Value of?
Land has remained an invaluable asset to mankind. The failure to secure the legal title to land by registration or by obtaining the approval/consent of the appropriate government authority usually leads to conflicts and expensive litigation. This Alert is meant to provide you with some information on the recognised methods of establishing title to land in Nigeria, the probative legal value of a certificate or right of occupancy - which is the most common form of land document in Nigeria - and the need to register all titles to land in Nigeria.
Methods of Establishing Land Title in Nigeria
The legal responsibility of establishing ownership to land in Nigeria is placed on the party who alleges that such a piece of property belongs to him or her. Five different methods are recognised for discharging this responsibility and they are:-
(a) Proof of ownership to land by traditional evidence, i.e., ancestral possession and inheritance.
(b) Production of land title document that is duly authenticated.
(c) Numerous positive acts of ownership over a sufficient length of time to warrant the reasonable inference of ownership.
(d) Acts of long undisturbed possession and enjoyment of land.
(e) Possession of adjacent land could raise the presumption of ownership of the land in question.
Certificate of Occupancy – Probative Value
A Certificate of Occupancy is the land title document that is delivered to the owner of a piece of land by the government attesting to the owner's title to the land which ownership is in accordance with the applicable law. Over time, users of land and financial institutions have elevated this type of land document to be conclusive evidence of the ownership of the land described in it, to the exclusion of any other party claiming title to the same piece of land.
Judicial decisions in Nigeria however indicate that a Certificate of Occupancy is merely a prima facie - first sight - evidence of an owner's title to the exact piece of land that is described in the Certificate of Occupancy. A Certificate of Occupancy is therefore not a conclusive proof of title to land neither does it validate spurious or fraudulent instruments of title to land which are in law fatally invalid.
Governor's Consent & Registration of Title
The Land Use Act extinguished the unlimited rights and interests to land that Nigerians had prior to the enactment of the Land Use Act. In place of the prior unexhausted rights to land, the Land Use Act vested all land in the territory of a state solely on the Governor of the State, who holds all land in that State in trust for the use and common benefit of all Nigerians. The Land Use Act also introduced a rigid regime of controls on the use or otherwise of all land in Nigeria.
One of the key controls introduced by the Land Use Act is the requirement that any transaction or instrument which confers or vests or transfers or limits or charges or extinguishes any interest or right in land on another party must first be approved by the Governor of the State where the land is situated. Where the prior approval or consent of the Governor is not first sought and obtained, such alienation or transfer is deemed in law to be null and void, and of no effect whatsoever. See, SAVANNAH BANK v. AJILO (1989) 1 SC (PT. 11) 90 @ 92
The argument that the failure to obtain Governor's consent only makes the transaction inchoate and not void has been rejected by the Supreme Court of Nigeria particularly where the application for Governor's consent was not made before the dispute was submitted for judicial adjudication, and where the application for consent is made and granted, the consent of the Governor must be pleaded and exhibited before final judgment is delivered. See, CALABAR CO-OP V. EKPO (2008) 1-2 SC 229 @ 285.
Registration of Land Instruments
The Land Instruments Registration Law of Lagos State requires that any document affecting land in Lagos State, in whatever manner, must be registered at the Lands Registry. Failure to register such a document implies that the document is void. Equally significant is the legal principle that a void document cannot be pleaded or held admissible by a Court of Law. The Registration of Titles Law of Lagos State also compulsorily requires all Instruments relating to land to be registered.
CONCLUSION
The clamour for appropriate amendments and in some instances outright abolition of the existing land legislations in Nigeria, at the federal and state levels, has been heightened in the present financial year. Without the necessary amendments, land transactions in Nigeria will not be business-friendly for meaningful development to take place.
Pending the time when the expected amendments to our land legislations are made, you will do well to ensure compliance with existing laws regulating ownership and control of land in Nigeria.
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This Alert and others produced by us are provided without any charge to you. You can always subscribe to it, on behalf of other interested persons from whom you have their permission, by sending to us a one line e-mail with the words "Subscribe – Legal Alerts" followed by the desired email address.
You are equally permitted to terminate your subscription by sending to us a one line email with the words "Unsubscribe - Legal Alerts" and your electronic address would be removed from our list. In the future, you can return to our mailing list by visiting our web site www.oseroghoassociates.com to subscribe for the Legal Alerts.
DISCLAIMER NOTICE. This Legal Alert is a free educational material, for your general information and enlightenment purposes ONLY. This Alert, by itself, does not create a Client/Attorney relationship between yourself and our Law Firm.
Recipients are therefore advised to seek professional legal counselling to their specific situations when they do arise. Questions, comments, criticisms, suggestions, new ideas, contributions, etc are always welcomed with many thanks.
This Legal Alert is protected by Intellectual Property Law and Regulations. It may however be shared with other parties provided that our Authorship is always acknowledged and this Disclaimer Notice is attached.
Legal Alert - Wills and Survivorships
In this Issue:
1. Legal Alert for May, 2009 – Wills and Survivorships.
2. Subscribe & Unsubscribe to Legal Alerts.
3. Disclaimer Notice.
Legal Alert for May 2009 – Wills and Survivorships.
In our Legal Alert for March 2003, we highlighted various aspects of Inheritance, Succession, Wills and Private Trust Laws in Nigeria. You can find this March 2003 Legal Alert on our website www.oseroghoassociates.com
It is observed that advancements in enlightenment, continues to reinforce the necessity for writing Wills. However, all manner of legal challenges, arising from disputes between the survivors of the beneficiaries of a Will, appear to be outpacing the traditional legal challenges to the authenticity of a Will, which are usually raised by the direct beneficiaries to the Will.
This Alert serves to remind you of what a Will is, the advantages of writing a Will, and the common law rules of survivorship in contrast to the customary law rules on the same subject.
What is a Will?
A working description of a Will is that it is a testamentary declaration contained in a deed, voluntarily made and executed according to Law by a Testator who is of sound mind and body, distributing his assets and giving such directives as he may wish to be carried out upon his death.
The instructions in a Will only take effect after the demise of its maker, i.e. the Testator. A Testator cannot however generally distribute a property which he inherited under native customary law.
What is a Codicil?
A Testator can always effect changes or amendments, or insert additional devises or bequests to his Will, while he is still alive, by making a Codicil. A Codicil is a supplementary deed to a Will which is made for the purpose of adding to or varying or revoking the provisions of an existing Will.
Advantages of a Will
(1) A Will excludes the rules of inheritance under native law and custom.
(2) A Will excludes the statutory rules of inheritance.
(3) A Will affords the Testator the opportunity to choose his executors, administrators and Guardians if the Testator's children are minors on his death.
(4) A Will avoids the extravagant bureaucratic costs, effort and time expended in applying for letters of administration.
(5) A Will allows the last surviving executor to complete the winding up of the administration of the estate without applying to the Probate Registry for the grant of fresh letters of administration.
(6) A Will allows the executors to it, to act as from the death of the Testator pending when final Probate is granted. E.g. follow burial rites instructions, act as Guardian of minor, if any, etc.
Wills and Survivorship
There are two kinds of survivorship. The first and more common one in Nigeria is known as Joint Tenancy. This is where two or more people jointly own a property. In the event of any of the owners pre-deceasing the other owner(s), the deceased owner's share of the property passes to the surviving beneficiaries of such a property to the exclusion of the estate of the deceased co-owner.
The other kind of survivorship is known as Tenancy-in-common. Here, in contrast to joint tenancy, the deceased owner's share of a property forms a part of his estate, to be inherited according to the terms of his or her Will - if there is any - or according to such Law that governed the deceased affairs during his life time.
Whether a devise or a bequest under a Will, to two or more beneficiaries, will be regulated by the rules of Joint Tenancy or Tenancy-in-common will depend on the interpretation of the wording of the Will.
Joint Tenancy and Tenancy-in-common
The rules regulating Joint Tenancies and Tenancies-in-common are common law rules which are not applicable to customary law modes of inheritance.
Where no specific words of severance are used in devolving a property, which words of severance indicate separate partitions or interest of the same property devolving to two or more beneficiaries, or to two or more people, the law assumes that a joint tenancy has been created with the result that the estate of any of the deceased co-owner cannot assume the place of the deceased in the enjoyment of such a property.
A Joint Tenancy is therefore implied where there is a unity of title, unity of interest, unity of time, and unity of possession.
Tenancy-in-common:
The presence of any of the following words in a Will creates a Tenancy-in-common: - "in equal shares"; "share and share alike"; "to be distributed between"; "to be distributed among them in joint and equal proportion"; "equally"; "among"; "respectively".
In the case of Chinweze v. Mazi (1989) 1 SC (part 11) 33 @ 46 for example, the Nigerian Supreme Court held that by operation of Law, Joint Tenancy leads to the doctrine of survivorship by which if one joint tenant dies without having obtained a separate share of the property for him or herself, during his or her life time, his or her interest will not pass to his or her estate but such interest will accrue to the other surviving joint tenants. The Nigerian Supreme Court also held that on the facts in this suit, the legal assignment it considered did not contain words of severance and therefore, the half brothers to the 2nd Defendant's sister could not take any benefit in the contested property due to the applicability of the rules of joint tenancy to the disputed property. The case of Sonekan v. Smith (1964) ANLR 161 is also recommended in the event that you intend to undertake further research on this subject.
Conclusion
In order for the intentions of a Testator or a benefactor to be achieved, it is recommended that utmost care and precision are exercised when drafting a Will or bequeathing a property. This caution or precision will truncate an avoidable litigation or dispute in the future.
Acknowledgements
We acknowledge the assistance of Mr. Babatola Apata, Barrister & Solicitor, and the Nigerian Law School "Course Handbook on Legal Drafting and Conveyancing", in preparing this Alert.
Subscribe & Unsubscribe to Legal Alerts
This Alert and others produced by us are provided without any charge to you. You can always subscribe to it, on behalf of other interested persons from whom you have their permission, by sending to us a one line e-mail with the words "Subscribe – Legal Alerts" followed by the desired email address.
You are equally permitted to terminate your subscription by sending to us a one line email with the words "Unsubscribe - Legal Alerts" and your electronic address would be removed from our list. In the future, you can return to our mailing list by visiting our web site www.oseroghoassociates.com to subscribe for the Legal Alerts.
DISCLAIMER NOTICE. This Legal Alert is a free educational material, for your general information and enlightenment purposes ONLY. This Alert, by itself, does not create a Client/Attorney relationship between yourself and our Law Firm.
Recipients are therefore advised to seek professional legal counselling to their specific situations when they do arise. Questions, comments, criticisms, suggestions, new ideas, contributions, etc are always welcomed with many thanks.
This Legal Alert is protected by Intellectual Property Law and Regulations. It may however be shared with other parties provided that our Authorship is always acknowledged and this Disclaimer Notice is attached.
Legal Alert Approved List of Taxes & Business Premises Levy
 
In this Issue:
1. Legal News – Lagos State Court of Arbitration
2. Legal Alert for April, 2009 – Approved List of Taxes & Business Premises Levy.
3. Subscribe & Unsubscribe to Legal Alerts.
4. Disclaimer Notice.
Legal News: Lagos State Arbitration Law & Court
The Lagos State Government has signed into Law an Arbitration Law and another legislation establishing an Arbitration Court for Lagos State.
Legal Alert for April 2009 – Approved List of Taxes & Business Premises Levy.
Tax is a charge or form of levy imposed by the government of a country on all kinds of property, persons and transactions, to raise money for various public needs. The generation of additional revenue is a key function of taxation as additional revenues to government enables the government to provide qualitative and quantitative services and utilities to its people.
Nigeria's over dependence on oil revenues has encouraged tax avoidance and inhibited the development of other sectors of the Nigerian economy including an efficient and effective tax administration system. Prior to the global economic melt down, local governments and state governments who have very low internally generated alternative sources of income outside the revenue derived from the federation account have resorted to illegal methods of collecting fictitious taxes which practices have among other things inhibited small and medium scale enterprises. To curb these multiple and unlawful tax practices, the Taxes and Levies (Approved List for Collection) Act 1998 No. 21 was enacted ("Approved List of Taxes Law").
In furtherance of increasing its revenues and acting within the ambit of the Law, some State Governments have recently commenced the issuance of demand notices for the strata of taxes that they are authorised to collect. The Business Premises Levy is one of such levies. This Alert therefore provides you with a summary of what taxes and levies each arm of government is authorised to charge and collect in Nigeria.
Approved List of Taxes for Collection by the Federal Government of Nigeria
Part 1 of the Schedule to the Approved List of Taxes Law enumerates the traditional taxes authorised for collection by the Federal Government of Nigeria to include Companies Income Tax, Petroleum Profit Tax, Value Added Tax, Education Tax, Capital Gains Tax for employees and residents of the Federal Capital Territory, Abuja ("FCT"), with non-residents and corporate bodies included; and withholding tax on the income of companies, residents of FCT and non-resident individuals.
Personal Income Tax in respect of the remuneration of members of the armed forces, the Police, residents of FCT, staff of the ministry of foreign affairs and non resident individuals are authorised to be collected by the Federal Government of Nigeria.
Approved List of Taxes for the State Governments
Part II of the Approved List of Taxes Law authorises State Governments to charge and collect personal income tax on the income of individuals only, withholding tax for individuals only, capital gains tax for individuals only, stamp duties fees on instruments executed by individuals only, pool betting and lotteries tax, gaming and casino taxes, road taxes, business premises registration fees for urban and rural areas, development levy for individuals only, street naming registration fees in the State capital only, right of occupancy fees on land owned by the government in urban areas of a State, market taxes and levies where State finance is involved.
Approved List of Taxes for Collection by Local Government Authorities
Taxes and levies approved for collection by local government areas include shops and kiosks rates, tenement rates, on and off liquor licence fees, slaughter slab fees, marriage, birth and death registration fees, street naming registration fees for non urban area streets, right of occupancy fees on lands in rural areas, market taxes and levies excluding where the State used its finances to construct the market, motor parks levies, domestic animals license fees, religious places permit fees, signboard and advertisement permit fees, wrong parking charges, vehicle radio licence fees to be imposed by the local government where the vehicle in registered, merriment and road closure levy, domestic animal license fees.
Collection & Related Offences
It is a mandatory provision of the Approved List of Taxes Law that no person other than the legally authorised tax authority of either the federal or state or local government area, as applicable, can access and collect any tax except as authorised under the Approved List of Taxes Law.
The unlawful mounting of road blocks on expressways in any part of Nigeria for the purpose of collecting any tax or levy with or without Policemen or other law enforcement agents is forbidden and punishable under this referenced Law.
Any person who collects or levies any tax or levy, or who mounts a road block or causes one to be mounted for the purpose of collecting any tax or levy contravenes Section 2 of the Approved List of Taxes Law and is liable on contravention to a fine of N500,000 or three years imprisonment or to both the fine and the term of imprisonment.
Business Premises Registration/Renewal Fees & Development Levy
Any business premises in an urban area of Nigeria is required to be registered on the payment of a N10,000 registration fee in the first year of registration, and N5,000 per annum as renewal registration fees in the subsequent years.
For rural areas, the business premises registration fees is N2,000 for the first year of registration, and N1,000 per annum as registration renewal fees for the subsequently years.
A development fee of N100 per annum per individual is also liable for payment by each taxable individual in the entire country.
Conclusion
Subject to the provisions of the Constitution of the Federal Republic of Nigeria, 1999 the Approved List of Taxes Law is the most comprehensive and authoritative legislation on the taxes that can be collected by each level of government – i.e. Federal, State or Local Government - in Nigeria.
Legal challenges on the taxing powers of the various tiers of government especially with respect to which tier of the government has the taxiing authority to charge and collect value added tax ("VAT"), lottery and gaming fees licences, vehicle registration fees, etc are pending in some courts of law.
It is expected that the Supreme Court decision in Attorney General of Ogun State v. Aberuagba & Ors (1997) 1 NRLR 51 on the taxing powers of the Federal and State Government will be revisited and further clarity brought to the subject matter in the light of this Law.
Enforcement of Section 2 of the Approved List of Taxes Law, being the unlawful mounting of road blocks with or without the security agents of the government, need to be strictly enforced as are the other provisions of the Law in order for the level of tax compliance to increase appreciatively.
Subscribe & Unsubscribe to Legal Alerts
This Alert and others produced by us are provided without any charge to you. You can always subscribe to it, on behalf of other interested persons from whom you have their permission, by sending to us a one line e-mail with the words "Subscribe – Legal Alerts" followed by the desired email address.
You are equally permitted to terminate your subscription by sending to us a one line email with the words "Unsubscribe - Legal Alerts" and your electronic address would be removed from our list. In the future, you can return to our mailing list by visiting our web site www.oseroghoassociates.com to subscribe for the Legal Alerts.
DISCLAIMER NOTICE. This Legal Alert is a free educational material, for your general information and enlightenment purposes ONLY. This Alert, by itself, does not create a Client/Attorney relationship between yourself and our Law Firm.
Recipients are therefore advised to seek professional legal counselling to their specific situations when they do arise. Questions, comments, criticisms, suggestions, new ideas, contributions, etc are always welcomed with many thanks.
This Legal Alert is protected by Intellectual Property Law and Regulations. It may however be shared with other parties provided that our Authorship is always acknowledged and this Disclaimer Notice is attached.